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Pentagon confirms authenticity of US Navy UFO videos leaked in 2017

publicado a la‎(s)‎ 5 may. 2020 6:36 por Plataforma Sites Dgac   [ actualizado el 10 sept. 2020 8:01 ]
Great interest among the public and the media had the Pentagon's release of three Navy videos showing what the US so far considers unidentified aerial phenomena, or UAP.
One of the images from the videos showing an unidentified aerial phenomenon taken by a US Navy fighter.

The Pentagon complex in Washington D.C.
These are videos that were already known, as they had been leaked three years ago by To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science, The New York Times and The Washington Post. 

The videos show flying objects recorded through an infrared camera that appear to move rapidly. In two of them, military personnel react with surprise because of the object’s speed, while a voice speculates that it could be a drone. 

In September, 2019, the US Navy acknowledged that the leaked videos were authentic. 

The Pentagon is now releasing them “to clear up any misconceptions by the public on whether or not the footage that has been circulating was real or whether or not there is more to the videos,” said spokeswoman Susan Gough.

"After a thorough review, the department has determined that the authorized release of these unclassified videos does not reveal any sensitive capabilities or systems, and does not impinge on any subsequent investigations of military air space incursions by unidentified aerial phenomena,” Gough added in a statement. 

Leak

The videos were originally released between December, 2017, and March, 2018, by To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science, a private group founded by former lead singer of rock group Blink-182 Tom DeLonge, who claims to study and collect information on unidentified aerial phenomena. 

According to The New York Times, one of the videos was filmed in 2004 by two Navy pilots and shows a round object hovering about 100 miles offshore over the Pacific Ocean. 

The other two videos were recorded in 2015 and show objects moving in the air, one of which rotates, and one of the pilots says “Hey, look at that thing! It's spinning!" 

Previously, the Pentagon had studied recordings of aerial encounters with unknown objects as part of a classified program that ended in 2012 and began in 2007 with the sponsorship of Nevada Senator Harry Reid.

After the news broke on Monday, April 27, regarding the official release of the videos by the Pentagon, Reid wrote on Twitter that he was “glad” for the decision, but that it only “scratches the surface of research and materials available. The U.S. needs to take a serious, scientific look at this and any potential national security implications. The American people deserve to be informed.” 

General interest 

However, the official disclosure and admission of authenticity of the videos by the Pentagon aroused global interest in learning more about it among the public and the media. 

In this context, media such as Chilevisión, CNN Chile and CNN en Español contacted the Committee for Studies on Anomalous Aerial Phenomena, CEFAA, to find out their opinion and seek background information on the matter from the official body in charge of studying the subject  in Chile.

CEFAA’s Director, Hugo Camus, replied to the requests and spoke to these media via videoconference due to the social distancing measures during the Covid-19 pandemic. 

“We look with great interest at the information published yesterday by the Pentagon, in which it acknowledged that those three videos that had already been broadcast in 2017 in the United States and in the rest of the world are, indeed, official videos taken by US Navy pilots,” Camus commented in a remote interview with CNN en Español’s Guillermo Arduino.

“Besides supporting the safety of air operations, our objective is also to motivate the new generations, in all countries, to have a critical spirit and to get stimulated with scientific knowledge. The idea is that our new generations can face this type of problem from science,” he added.
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