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First reports of the Investigative Commission

publicado a la‎(s)‎ 12 mar. 2019 7:47 por Plataforma Sites Dgac   [ actualizado el 20 ago. 2020 12:34 ]


Sergio Bravo Flores, the fomer Director of the Chilean Commission for the Study of Unidentified Space Objects.
Sergio Bravo Flores, the first Director of the Chilean Commission for the Study of Unidentified Space Objects, created in July, 1968, in Santiago, and who was then the Chile’s Meteorological Bureau Director, said that it was the Scientific Society who encouraged the creation of that investigative body. 

That Commission was the first official entity in the country that collected and investigated the accounts from the staff from more than 40 radiostations and meteorological stations between Arica and the Chilean Antarctic.

On July 9, 1968, Chile’s Meteorological Bureau chief signed the first official document requesting reports to the experts who worked at those venues along the country.
 
In that memo it was explained why the Commission had been created and the work it would undertake: “In the document —recalled Sergio Bravo— it was specified that the goal would be: research and collect information related to the true causes related to this subject that gives rise to so many controversies in Chile and abroad.”

Along that memorandum, sent to 43 stations in the national territory, there were sent forms to be filled with all available details about the observed phenomena.
 
"I remember —Bravo said— that on that occasion we asked that the two forms would be sent to the office at Quinta Normal, Santiago, with extreme urgency and that they should be filled with the highest amount of objective information gathered.”

The Director said that in that time —1967 and 1968— written news media published many pieces on the sighting of “unidentified flying objects. There was a lot of expectation among the public opinion regarding this kind of phenomena. This Commission was born from that,” he explained.

The Scientific Society, which hosted the most prominent men of science from those years, wrote a document in which it defined what was understood as an unidentified flying object: “all visible object that can be photographed or detected by radar or other means, that moved in the extraterrestrial space and whose nature is unknown or undetermined.”
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